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Unexplained occurrence: Black holes spit out stars from their ancient feasts

Black holes eject mysterious stars, baffling researchers.

Black holes are some of the most enigmatic and potent entities in the cosmos. Their immense density renders them so gravitationally powerful that not even light can escape their clutches. When a star ventures too close to a black hole, it undergoes a harrowing process, torn apart into a stream of gas and dust that is subsequently devoured by the voracious black hole.

Recently, however, astronomers have made a startling revelation: black holes can, on occasion, “burp up” remnants of the material they had consumed many years earlier. This phenomenon is known as a tidal disruption event (TDE).

TDEs are believed to transpire when a star strays too close to a supermassive black hole, a variety of black hole that dwarfs our sun by millions or even billions of times in mass. The supermassive black hole’s gravitational forces dismantle the star, generating a torrent of gas and dust that descends towards the black hole.



While most of the gas and dust eventually succumbs to the black hole’s relentless pull, some can evade capture, forming a disk encircling the black hole. This disk can heat up and emit detectable radiation.

Astronomers have previously witnessed TDEs, but the revelation that certain TDEs can “reignite” years after the initial event has been a source of astonishment. This hints that black holes can somehow regurgitate portions of the material they had consumed years earlier.

Scientists are currently endeavoring to fathom the underlying reasons for this phenomenon. One possibility is that the black hole’s gravitational influence is not as overpowering as previously conceived. Another conjecture is that the black hole is spinning at an extraordinary rate, expelling the material.

Whatever the cause may be, the discovery of black holes belching up stars represents a momentous stride in our comprehension of these enigmatic entities. It implies that black holes are more intricate than previously envisaged, potentially playing a more pivotal role in the evolution of galaxies.



Implications for the study of black holes and TDEs

The revelation that black holes can regurgitate stars years after consuming them carries significant implications for the study of black holes and TDEs.

First and foremost, it suggests that black holes are more intricate than previously postulated. Scientists had hitherto assumed that once a star was ripped apart by a black hole, it was irrevocably lost. However, the fact that black holes can regurgitate this material intimates that they may possess the ability to retain and process material for extended periods, perhaps even decades, before eventual consumption.

Secondly, the discovery of black holes disgorging stars could yield insights into the evolution of galaxies. TDEs are believed to have been a substantial energy source in the early universe and may have contributed to the formation of the initial stars and galaxies. A deeper comprehension of TDEs could facilitate a better understanding of the evolutionary history of galaxies.



Lastly, the revelation of black holes expelling stars might lead to innovative methods of detecting these cosmic anomalies. Currently, astronomers employ various techniques to detect black holes, including scrutinizing their gravitational influences on neighboring stars and galaxies. These methods can be arduous and time-consuming. The discovery of black holes disgorging stars could pave the way for more expeditious and straightforward methods of black hole detection.

In sum, the discovery of black holes disgorging stars marks a momentous advancement in our comprehension of these inscrutable entities. It carries multifaceted implications for the study of black holes and TDEs, potentially opening new avenues for black hole detection.